Teaching Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Teaching Grammar with Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie Bucket comes from a poor family where having seconds of a watered down soup on Sundays is a real treat. After finding a dollar lying in the street, Charlie buys a Wonka’s Whipple-Scrumptious Fudgemallow Delight and finds the golden ticket that allows him to tour Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. Charlie brings along Grandpa Joe for the adventure. The two are amazed at all the marvels in chocolate factory. Read Roald Dahl’s delightful book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to learn of Charlie’s adventures on this tour.

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Ten Interesting Facts . . . . Veterans Day

Ten Interesting Facts ~ Veterans Day

1. Veterans Day is an official United States holiday that celebrates veterans who served in any U. S. Armed Forces. Continue Reading

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Native Americans

Native American Chart

Native Americans

Native Americans is one of my favorite topics to teach. It doesn’t matter the grade level; students are fascinated. They become active learners when studying about different tribes, customs, etc.

One great way to begin your exploration is with this Native American chart. Each box contains links to information written by students. The webpages are not only full of great information but student-made dioramas, Native American crafts, and costumes. Continue Reading

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Five Analogy Activities

Free Analogy Task Cards Hosted by Boom Learning

Analogy Activities

Analogies are such an important skill for students to master. Many standardized tests use analogies to check for vocabulary mastery. Included here are three analogy activities you can use in the classroom to help your students practice analogies. Continue Reading

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Teaching Ideas for Holes by Louis Sachar

Free Printable Character Trait Booklets to use with Holes by Louis Sachar

Holes by Louis Sachar

Accused of a crime he did not commit, Stanley Yelnats is sentenced to Camp Green Lake for rehabilitation. Almost immediately, Stanley realizes digging a large hole each day is not just punishment. The Warden is looking for something special. Continue Reading

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Chronological, Sequential, and Consecutive Order

Teaching Sequential Order ~ Ideas, links, and a free graphic organizer

Chronological, Sequential, and Consecutive Order

I have found that by teaching my students that they may order nonfiction texts in three different ways – chronological, sequential, and consecutive order – really helps their comprehension of the material. Here is how I cover the three ordering topics:

Chronological Order

Chronological order usually refers to how things happen in order of time. The segments of time may go forward or backward. This pattern works well when telling a story. History is told in chronological order. Also explaining how something happens or works is chronological order. Chronological order may recount a series of events that happened over time. This structure is organized from one point in time to another. Continue Reading

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Main Idea Teaching Activities

Main Idea Teaching Activities

Teachers should begin main idea lessons by explaining the basic structure of paragraphs.

EXAMPLE –A paragraph consists of a group of sentences that relate to a specific topic called the main idea or central thought. The main idea is expressed in a sentence called the topic sentence. The remaining sentences add details. These are called supporting details. When reading a paragraph look for transition words [but, however, etc.]. These often change the meaning of the paragraph. Readers can look for the main idea by asking ‘Who?‘ or ‘What?‘. Answers to ‘Where?‘ ‘When?‘ and ‘Why?‘ usually provide details to support the main idea. Continue Reading

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