Ideas to Teach Appositives

 This blog post also includes a free printable organizer to help teach students appositive rules.

What is an appositive? An appositive is a word or group of words that explain or define a noun. Appositives follow the nouns they explain.

When to Use Commas

Appositives can be either restrictive or nonrestrictive. I teach students to first locate the appositive by finding the phrase that describes the noun. Next, I ask students to read the sentence skipping the appositive. If the meaning of the sentence is clear without the appositive, then it is nonrestrictive [CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.6.2.A]. Use commas to separate nonrestrictive elements from the rest of the sentence.  Continue Reading

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Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes Activities

Teaching Activities for Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Ghost Boys begins with the death of twelve-year-old Jerome Rogers and slowly unfolds through a series of flashbacks. Jerome lives in an improvised neighborhood in Chicago. His walk to school is dangerous including going past drug dealers. Jerome is bullied for being a good student.

One day a new kid comes to school, Carlos Rodríguez. Jerome knows right away that he is going to be a target for bullies. Jerome decides to help Carlos by showing him how to grab his lunch then eat it in the upstairs restroom. Unfortunately, the bullies find the two and begin beating on Carlos. Jerome draws the attention of the bullies away from Carlos. When he does, Carlos pulls out a gun. The bullies back down and leave. Carlos tells Jerome the gun is just a toy made from plastic. He carried it to school because he was afraid. Continue Reading

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Memorization Techniques

10 Memorization Techniques

Are your students having difficulty memorizing information for tests? Learning steps in a process, lists, or simple facts can be a challenge for most students. Try some of these memorization techniques. They will make a difference.

Some facts must be memorized in a specific order. Name mnemonics and acrostics as well as using the Method of Loci help students recall details in a specific sequence. Continue Reading

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How to Eat Fried Worms Book Unit Ideas

How to Eat Fried Worms Book Unit

In How to Eat Fried Worms, Billy makes a bet with his friend Alan that he can eat 15 worms, one each day, for fifteen days. Tom plans to be Billy’s second, or witness. Joe is going to be Alan’s second. Joe and Alan plan all sorts of schemes to win the bet. In one funny part of the story, Billy pretends that eating the worm has made him crazy. He goes around flapping his arms like a chicken. Students will love reading this hilarious book. 

FREE Teaching Ideas for How to Eat Fried Worms

Activity #1 Pom-Pom Worms

While reading How to Eat Fried Worms, students made worms from pipe cleaners, pom-poms, and wiggly eyes. Every year after I know the novels I plan to teach, I love browsing the pages of Oriental Trading to see what cute, easy projects they provide. Their craft kits are very reasonable priced. Here is a link if you would like to check out this company. Continue Reading

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Teaching Students to Predict Outcomes

Ideas for Teaching Students to Make Inferences

Teaching students the differences between making inferences, drawing conclusions, and predicting outcomes may be one of the most difficult skills to teach.  This series of three posts includes definitions, examples, and activities. 

Predicting Outcomes

A reader predicts outcomes by making a guess about what is going to happen.  Continue Reading

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Teaching Students to Draw Conclusions

Ideas for Teaching Students to Draw Conclusions

Teaching students the differences between making inferences, drawing conclusions, and predicting outcomes may be one of the most difficult skills to teach.  This series of three posts includes definitions, examples, and activities. 

Conclusions

Conclusions are opinions, judgments, or decisions that are formed based on a situation’s facts. A reader or observer collects information. Readers weigh the evidence. The evidence proves what is going to happen or the next logical step in the information series. Continue Reading

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Teaching Students to Make Inferences

Ideas for Teaching Students to Make Inferences

Teaching students the differences between making inferences, drawing conclusions, and predicting outcomes may be one of the most difficult skills to teach.  This series of three posts includes definitions, examples, and activities. 

Inferences

An inference is a conclusion reached on the basis of evidence and reasoning. Readers infer many topics. For example — Continue Reading

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