Teaching Person vs. Person Conflict with Movie Clips

Teaching Person vs. Person Conflict with Movie Clips

In a person vs. person conflict, the conflict is between two forms of like beings. This is often the protagonist versus the antagonist. The conflict may be verbal, physical, or emotional.

Check out these books and videos to teach students about a person vs. person conflict.

Examples from Person vs. Person from Literature

Picture Books

  • The Ugly Duckling
  • Rumpelstiltskin
  • The Tale of Peter Rabbit
  • Angel Child, Dragon Child
  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  • Harriet and the Promised Land
  • The Hundred Penny Box

 

Children’s Literature

  • Fantastic Mr. Fox
  • The Westing Game
  • Out of my Mind
  • Shiloh
  • From Where the Red Fern Grows – Billy and his dogs are attacked by a mountain lion, and they must do everything they can to survive.
  • From Weasel – Nathan is captured by Weasel, an Indian fighter. Earlier in the book, Weasel had attacked Nathan’s pa, had taken away Pa’s riffle, and had killed the farm animals.

Teaching Person vs. Person Conflict with Movie Trailers

Cruella De Vil from 101 Dalmatians

Cruella is married to a furrier who she claims has never made her a fur coat from dog pelts. She becomes enemies with the Radcliffes when they refuse to sell their puppies. 

 

Shere Khan and Kaa from The Jungle Book

A Bengal tiger named Shere Khan is the main antagonist of Disney’s 1967 animated version of The Jungle Book. Shere orders Kaa to act as an informant.

 

 

Gaston and the Beast from Beauty and the Beast

Gaston wants to marry Belle because she is the most beautiful girl in the village. He becomes upset that Belle does not show any interest in him and instead likes the Beast.

 

Jafar from Aladdin

Jafar is the Royal Vizier of Agrabah who plans to overtake the kingdom through the power of a genie.

 

 

Hades vs Hercules

Hades is the antagonist of Hercules in the Disney version of the story. 

 

Captain Hook and Peter Pan

Captain Hook is a pirate who repeatedly fights Peter Pan. 

 

 

FREE Conflicts in Literature Organizer

 

Types of Conflicts Quiz

From Davy Crockett

One rainy afternoon I went to Rattle-Snake Swamp to get a turkey-buzzard. My wife wanted me to get something nice for our dinner. I took my dog and rifle and struck out right away. I had got down about as far as where the wood opens at the Big Gap, when I saw it was so dark that I could hardly see at all. All at once, or I might say, all at twice, for it was done double quick time, I felt something catch me around the middle. It squeezed me like it was an old acquaintance. I looked up and saw pretty quick it was no relation of mine. It was a great bear that was hugging me like a brother.

Which event most likely the main cause of the conflict?

    1.   being hungry
    2.   going hunting with a rifle
    3.   invading a predator’s territory
    4.   the darkness of the woods

From Stone Fox

Every February the National Dogsled Races were held in Jackson, Wyoming. People came from all over to enter the race, and some of the finest dog teams in the country were represented. It was an open race—any number of dogs could be entered. Even one. The race covered ten miles of snow-covered countryside, starting and ending on Main Street right in front of the old church. There was a cash prize for the winner. The amount varied from year to year. This year it just happened to be five hundred dollars.

“Sure,” Lester said as he pried the nail loose and handed little Willy the poster. “I’ll pick up another at the mayor’s office.” Lester was skinny but strong, wore a white apron, and talked with saliva on his lips. “Gonna be a good one this year. They say that mountain man, the Indian called Stone Fox, might come. Never lost a race. No wonder, with five Samoyeds.”

But little Willy wasn’t listening as he ran out of the store, clutching the poster in his hand. “Thank you, Lester. Thank you!”

Grandfather’s eyes were fixed on the ceiling. Little Willy had to stand on his toes in order to position the poster directly in front of Grandfather’s face.

“I’ll win!” little Willy said. “You’ll see. They’ll never take this farm away.”

Which sentence from the story is most likely to lead to the main conflict?

    1.  People came from all over to enter the race, and some of the finest dog teams in the country were represented.
    2.   The race covered ten miles of snow-covered countryside, starting and ending on Main Street right in front of the old church.
    3.   They say that mountain man, the Indian called Stone Fox, might come. Never lost a race.
    4. They’ll never take this farm away

Teaching Conflict in Literature (Person vs. the Environment) Using Movie Trailers

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