Category: Lesson Plan

Understatement Definition and Examples

This figurative language lesson on irony includes a free organizer and digital resource. 4th, 5th, and 6th graders will love these fun activities. This lesson covers the definition with examples appropriate for upper elementary students.

An understatement is a figure of speech when a speaker makes the situation seem less important or severe than what it is. The remark makes something seem smaller. An understatement adds humor to serious situations. When verbal, the speaker delivers the statement without expression for effect.

Think of an understatement as the opposite of hyperbole. Continue Reading

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Sarcasm Definition and Examples

This figurative language lesson on irony includes a free organizer and digital resource. 4th, 5th, and 6th graders will love these fun activities. This lesson covers the definition with examples appropriate for upper elementary students.

Sarcasm is a difference or contrast between expectations and realities in a circumstance.  Irony is often only recognized well after an original statement or occurrence since it often takes current events to realize the previous remark was completely wrong.

Sarcasm is a remark that people use to say the opposite of what’s true with a purpose to amuse or hurt someone by making them feel foolish. Continue Reading

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Irony Definition, Examples, and Lesson

This figurative language lesson on irony includes a free organizer and digital resource. 4th, 5th, and 6th graders will love these fun activities. This lesson covers the definition with examples appropriate for upper elementary students.

Irony is a difference or contrast between expectations and realities in a circumstance.  Irony is often only recognized well after an original statement or occurrence since it often takes current events to realize the previous remark was completely wrong.

Examples

#1 – Otto Lilienthal, creator of a flying glider, was killed by his own invention after declaring that it was one of the safest ways to travel. Continue Reading

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Pun Definition and Examples

This figurative language lesson on puns includes a free organizer and digital resource. 4th, 5th, and 6th graders will love these fun activities. This lesson covers the definition with examples appropriate for upper elementary students.

A pun is a joke misusing  the different possible meanings of a word or the fact that there are words which sound alike but have different meanings. Continue Reading

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Oxymoron Definition, Examples, and Lesson

This figurative language lesson on oxymoron includes a free organizer and digital resource. 4th, 5th, and 6th graders will love these fun activities. This lesson covers the definition with examples appropriate for upper elementary students.

Oxymoron is a figure of speech which contains words that seem conflicting to one another. Continue Reading

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Writing Lesson Plans that Work

Get your Sunday afternoons back by ignoring the newest trend for lesson plan writing. Find a plan that works for you and stick to it.

Have you ever noticed how quickly educational trends change? Today the best program, fad, or technique is a must and even a requirement for teachers. A year or two later, take out the old and bring in the new. Teachers can soon become overwhelmed with keeping up. Writing lesson plans is one area this is obvious. Continue Reading

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Malapropism Definition, Examples, and Lesson

This figurative language lesson on malapropism includes a free organizer and digital resource. 4th, 5th, and 6th graders will love these fun activities. This lesson covers the definition with examples appropriate for upper elementary students.

A malaprop is a mistaken use of a word in place of a similar-sounding one, often with an amusing effect. The term came from the eighteenth-century play The Rivals by Richard Sheridan. Throughout the play, Mrs. Malaprop purposely made blunders by mixing up similar sounding words for humor. From this came the new words: Malaprop and malapropism.

Over time the definition of Malaprop has been refined. A Malaprop must contain three features: Continue Reading

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