ACE – A Writing Strategy

What is the ACE Writing Strategy?

Help students organize their writing by using the ACE Writing Strategy. This teaching device helps organize the answers to short answer/constructive response questions. It prevents students from guessing the answers by providing a structured response to the question. The acronym stands for…

A – Answer all parts of the question in complete sentences.

C – Cite evidence from the text.

E – Explain how your evidence proves or supports your answer.

 

Check out this free staggered flip organizer explaining the ACE Writing Strategy.A – Answer all parts of the question in complete sentences.

  • Carefully read the question.
  • Reword the original question in the form of an introductory sentence.
  • Be sure to include the key words.

This will prove that you understand the question.

C – Cite evidence from the text.

Find evidence from the reading selection, graphics, or illustrations to support or prove your answer.

Use a transitional phrase to introduce your quote:

According to the text…

For example…

For instance…

To illustrate…

Remember, quotation marks must enclose cited text.

E – Explain how your evidence proves or supports your answer.

  • Make a clear connection between the evidence you cite and the question asked.
  • Explain how the quotation supports your answer.
  • Conclude by adding your thoughts.

Example

Question – From which point of view is The Wonderful Wizard of Oz told? What is the narrator’s perspective?

A (Notice the key words point of view and perspective as well as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz are used in the introductory sentence.)

The reader can find the point of view and perspective used in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by reading a small selection of the story. 

C (Three passages are quoted.)

In the text, the author reveals Dorothy’s thoughts. “Dorothy was puzzled at this, for it sounded queer to hear a stuffed man speak, and to see him bow and walk along beside her.” The narrator also tells the reader that Dorothy was “truly sorry for him.” Toto’s thoughts are also included, “Toto did not like this addition to the party at first.”

E (An explanation connects the quotes to the answer.)

L. Frank Baum tells The Wonderful Wizard of Oz from third person point of view through a narrator. The reader knows this because the narrator uses characters’ names in place of the pronoun I when revealing thoughts. The narrator also shows the thoughts of more than one character creating an omniscient viewpoint.

 

This download contains printables to create the staggered flip organizer to teach these steps to students. 

Gay Miller

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