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Mar 16

Teaching the Persuasive Technique – Loaded Terms

 

This is the third post in a series of four on using persuasive techniques or propaganda devices. This post contains several commercials that use loaded terms to advertise their products. 

Loaded Terms Definition

Phrases with loaded terms have words that evoke strong emotions. Advertisements, speeches, and writers all use loaded terms.

Politicians use loaded words in speeches when trying to put a positive spin on delicate issues. Often speeches use words that trigger strong feelings. For example, the word terrorist causes the hearer to think of torture and a need for freedom.

Advertisements often use high-inference language to promote people or products. These words can arouse either strong positive or negative reactions. In the examples below, commercials use loaded words.

Loaded Terms in Advertisements

Expedia “Train” makes traveling the answer to many problems:

  • influence narrow minds
  • bridge continents
  • puncture prejudice
  • keep peace

Jeep Whole Again Super Bowl Commercial (2013)

This commercial speaks to the soldier who is away servicing his country. Oprah uses rich language to tell the soldier that he is missed and his family is waiting. Here are a few of the phrases:

  • a favorite dinner waiting
  • In our hearts, you’ve been missed.
  • You’ve been needed.
  • You’ve been cried for.

Evony: The King’s Return Battle of Evony 

This ad uses powerful images with only a few words, but they are powerful. The ad builds to a battle scene:

  • Brave fellows, your country is at stake.
  • Fight for liberty.
  • Ready!
  • Charge!
  • Let Your Reign Begin

Wendy’s 2017 Fresh Beef Commercial “Cold Storage”

This advertisement goes with staying away from something that is negative. No one wants frozen beef.

Fresh, Never-Frozen Beef

 

 Kia Super Bowl Commercial “The Perfect Getaway” 

While this commercial can be considered a testimonial since it features Pierce Brosnan, the language is quite descriptive especially the final line “Explosions.”

 

Teaching the Persuasive Technique Loaded Words with Commercials
Gay Miller

 

 

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