Authentic Learning – A Teaching Strategy

Authentic Learning – A Teaching Strategy

What is an authentic learning task?

Authentic learning provides tasks that allow students to learn through real-life situations. Students apply what they have learned in class to realistic circumstances. Often students go outside the classroom. This could include field trips.

For example, students studying finance may visit a business to see how it operates. Students then evaluate the practices the business uses. This aids in a simulation where students create a mock business.

In authentic learning, students collaborate with their peers. Teachers take on the role of coach supporting student learning. 

Examples

  • Simulations
    • Students go through the procedures of running a lemonade stand.
    • Students conduct mock trails.
  • Engagement
    • Learners conduct fund-raisers for specific causes such as ‘Schools for Africa.’
    • Teachers write grants all the time. Turn the tables. Have students write grants to receive school supplies.
    • Students create and conduct a survey.
    • Environmentalists solve a local issue. This could be to organize a town clean-up day. Students could also figure out creative ways to get the town to recycle.
  • Creating Media
    • Pupils go through all the step of creating an ad campaign.
    • Students create a video about their hometown. Videos can include interviews, narratives, and skits.
    • Artists create the next Google doodle. This may sound like a simple project, but it requires research. Students must research the event connected with the special event. ‘This Day in History.’ The logos usually go to a write-up about the special day.
    • Learners develop a new game.
    • Students compose letters. This could be a letter to the author asking questions about the book. A letter could be written to a city official detailing a change that should be done.
    • Writers publish a class book. Class books could include poetry or short stories. Illustrations would also need to be included.
    • Instead of asking students to write an ordinary book review, have them write reviews for Amazon. Goodreads is also a website that accepts book reviews.
    • Readers create book trailers for Youtube.
    • Artists design movie sets.
  • Performance
    • Learners reenact real-world situations through skits and plays.
    • Students dress in costumes and act out characters from novels.
    • Students share history through a real-life wax museum.
    • Learners take on the role of historical figures being interviewed.
    • Singers write jingles.

Advantages 

  • actively engages students
  • relevant to students’ lives
  • prepares students for careers
  • exposes students to different perspectives
  • uses an interdisciplinary approach
  • requires higher order thinking skills
  • provides opportunities for collaboration

Give this Strategy a Try

One great end of the year project is to have students plan a vacation. This includes planning meals, travel plans, hotels, and entertainment. You can find a sample vacation planning lesson here. This free handout includes charts for students to plan all expenses. 

 

Free Printables to Guide Students Through an Authentic Task - Planning a Vacation

 

Gay Miller

Permanent link to this article: http://bookunitsteacher.com/wp/?p=5801

I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 Teaching Ideas

Lauren Tarshis’s eleventh book in her popular I Survived Series tackles the Great Chicago Fire of 1871.

Eleven-year old Oscar lived in Castle, Minnesota with his father and mother. After his father died in a blizzard, Oscar became the ‘man of the house’ looking after the farm.

Mr. Morrow, who was an artist for a Chicago newspaper, came to Castle to draw pictures of the farmland. He spent a lot to time drawing Oscar’s farm during the day and sitting on the porch talking to Mama at night. The two wrote letters after he went home. One day Mama announced that she and Mr. Morrow were getting married, and they were all moving to Chicago.

Oscar traveled by train to Chicago. While in the train station, he was tricked into leaving the baggage unguarded. Otis and his gang of thugs stole it. Mr. Morrow told Oscar it was no big deal. He wanted to treat Mama and him to a fancy meal at the Palmer House. They rode a taxi to the hotel. As they were going inside the hotel, Oscar saw the girl who had tricked him into leaving the baggage. Oscar left the hotel to chase her down.

Oscar discovered the girl, Jennie, was an orphan who had helped the thugs in order to have food for her little brother, Bruno. As Oscar was walking away, he found himself in a fire storm. Oscar took refuge from the flying sparks in a chicken coop. While there, Oscar saw Jennie and Bruno’s house catch fire.

What should Oscar do? Would he run inside a house to rescue the girl who tricked him? 

FREE Teaching Ideas for
I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871

Activity #1 

Lessons from History: The Chicago Fire of 1871 contains an interview between Lauren Tarshis and Casey Grant from the National Fire Protection Association. 

 Activity #2 

Lauren Tarshis’s website offers several free activities to use with the book. Each of these links go to DOC files that can be edited to meet the needs of your students.

Activity #3

Compare before and after photographs of the fire. This website from Chicago Magazine is a great place to start. Another great source for before and after photos is The Great Chicago Fire & The Web of Memory.

Activity #4

Have students create a Venn Diagram comparing and contrasting Chicago statistical information at the time of the fire to today. Students should include:

  • population
  • size of the city compared to other US cities in land area and/or population
  • modes of transportation
  • means of communication

Activity #5

Have students illustrate the song “Old Mother Leary”.

Activity #6

If you would like to try out the I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 Book Unit before you buy it, this download contains free samples including:

  • Vocabulary Practice for Chapters 1-2
  • Comprehension Questions for Chapters 1-2 
  • Constructive Response Question for Chapters 1-2 
  • Photos to Show What the Rest of the Unit Looks Like

I Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 Book UnitI Survived the Great Chicago Fire, 1871 Book Unit contains graphic organizers for an interactive notebook. Vocabulary, comprehension, constructive response writing, and skill practice are all included. Printable and digital versions are available.

Gay Miller

 

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Using Animated Shorts to Teach Compare and Contrast

Compare and Contrast

Free Printables to Use with Animated Shorts (Compare and Contrast)

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore is a beautiful award winning film. After winning 14 smaller awards, it won the Best Animated Short Film at the Academy Awards in 2012. A picture book was created based on the film which makes it ‘fantastic’ as a compare and contrast activity.

In this free sample from Using Animated Shorts to Teach Reading and Writing Skills, students compare The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore to the movie version of The Wizard of Oz which inspired the film.

Animated Shorts

The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore (2011) from N S on Vimeo.

Handout

This post is a sample of my new product Using Animated Short Films to Teach Reading Skills Part 2. Each month one additional post from this series will go live. You can find the links and post dates listed below.

Each post will contain one animated short with a printable handout. You can collect all ten by coming back each month. The full products, divided into two parts, contain over 50 student printables each for a total of 100+. 

The printables contain organizers with guiding questions to help students evaluate the short film and learn valuable reading skills. All short films will be added to a webpage on Book Units Teacher for easy access. The link to this webpage will be included in the purchased product.

Check out the products on Teachers Pay Teachers:

Part 1 – 52 Organizers

Teaching Reading and Writing Skills with Animated Shorts Pt 1 [Digital + Printable]

Teaching Reading and Writing Skills with Animated Shorts Pt 1 [Printable]

Part 2 – An Additional 52 Organizers

Teaching Reading and Writing Skills with Animated Shorts Pt 2 [Digital + Printable]

Teaching Reading and Writing Skills with Animated Shorts Pt 2  [Printable]

Blog Post Links and Publication Dates

 

Gay Miller

Permanent link to this article: http://bookunitsteacher.com/wp/?p=5604

Helping Readers Bloom Spring Link-up

Using the Novel Wishtree by Katherine Applegate to Promote ReadingWelcome to the Helping Readers Bloom Spring Link-up.

The Reading Crew is a group of primary through middle school reading specialists. About three to four times a year, we share materials and ideas through a blog link up. Enjoy reading through our posts and collecting free materials to use in your classroom this spring. Links to all the posts are found at the end of this post. Before you leave, enter the rafflecopter also found at end of this post. The raffle will be open from 4/6/18 (6:00 AM EST) to 4/11/18 at (6:00 AM EST). We are giving away over $600.00 in prizes including an Apple iPad mini WiFi + gift cards for a total of 8 winners. Have a great time exploring our blog posts, and I wish you luck in the raffle!

Great prizes from The Reading Crew Raffle - Be sure to enter.

Fans of The One and Only Ivan and Crenshaw are going to love Katherine Applegate’s newest novel Wishtree. The story is told from the perspective of Red, a 216 year old red oak tree living in a suburban neighborhood. Red is one special tree. Every May Day, people in the area tie pieces of fabric with wishes all over Red. Because Red has witnessed years of humans telling her their deepest wishes as they tie rags onto her branches, she understands sadness. 

A Muslim family with a daughter named Samar moves into Red’s neighborhood. Red sees how lonely Samar is and wants to help her. Red discusses Samar with the animals that live in her branches hoping for a way to help. One day, Samar ties a wish on Red. Her wish is simple; she wants a friend. With the aid of the animals, Red helps Samar and teaches an important lesson to the entire neighborhood in the process.

The story is tangled with several subplots dealing with prejudice making it must-read for students.

Activities to Use with WishtreeFree Activities to Use with the Novel Wishtree by Katherine ApplegateThis handout contains four activities to use with the book Wishtree.

Four Corners

Four corners is a great activity to introduce the book Wishtree. Have students move into groups based on whether or not they believe in specific good luck objects or practices. The handout includes full instructions including suggested questions for this activity.

Nonfiction Article “Wish Trees”

This article provides an overview of what wish trees are as well as different types of wish trees found around the world. Comprehension questions follow the article  making it a great close reading activity.

Wish Tree Craftivity 

After discussing the significance of wish trees, have students create a wish tree full of their own wishes. These would look fantastic mounted on construction paper and placed on a bulletin board. Add a catchy title such as…. 

DREAM big, SPARKLE more, and SHINE bright.

 

The Craftivity Project

Free Printables to Create this Craftivity to use with the novel Wishtree by Katherine Applegate

Wishtree Book Unit Samples 

The handout link [same handout as the link above] contains three samples: vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. For a more detailed sample click here.

Wishtree Novel Study can be found on Teachers Pay Teachers.

 

After entering the raffle, click this link to check out Cathy’s post next.

Gay Miller

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Free Activities to Use with the novel Wishtree by Katherine Applegate

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The Wild Robot Escapes Activities

The Wild Robot Escapes

 

The Wild Robot Escapes by Peter Brown combines a science fiction story involving a robot of the future with a fantasy in which animals talk. This sequel beautifully wraps up the story.

Roz works on the Hilltop Farm for the Shareef family. The family needs Roz because Mrs. Shareef died in an accident on the farm, and Mr. Shareef injured his leg. Because Mr. Shareef can no longer do farm work, he scrapes together enough money to purchase a refurbished robot to run the dairy farm. Roz works with the animals and makes sure the equipment runs smoothly, all the while planning an escape to return back to her wild island home.

There is no question about it; your students will love this book!

Teaching Ideas for the Book

Robot Printables

Click the images to grab these free printables.Free Printable Robot Coloring Page
Free Printables for Creating Your Own RobotRobot Coloring PageScience Activity

Explore the balance and center of gravity plus the gliding robot with these free printable. The blog posts from BUGgy and BuDdy also includes short videos to see the robots in action.

Great Science Experiments with Robots - These activities are perfect to add a little science in with your The Wild Robot Escapes unit.Peter Brown’s Website

In this really cool blog post, viewers can see the process Peter Brown went through to write The Wild Robot Escapes. Check out his research process, story map, plot points, and illustrations

Audio Books

Listen to the first three minutes of the story from audiobooks.com.

Wild Robot Snack

Cute and Healthy The Wild Robot SnackThe Wild Robot Book Unit

The Wild Robot Escapes Book UnitIf you would like to try out the The Wild Robot Escapes Book Unit before you buy it, this download contains free samples including:

  • Vocabulary Practice for Chapters 1-2
  • Comprehension Questions for Chapters 1-2
  • Constructive Response Question – Setting
  • Photos to Show What the Rest of the Unit Looks Like

The Wild Robot Escapes Book UnitThe Wild Robot Escapes Book Unit contains graphic organizers for an interactive notebook and game activities covering vocabulary, comprehension questions, comprehension, constructive response writing, and skill practice.

 


Gay Miller

 

 

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ACE – A Writing Strategy

What is the ACE Writing Strategy?

 

Help students organize their writing by using the ACE Writing Strategy. This teaching device helps organize the answers to short answer/constructive response questions. It prevents students from guessing the answers by providing a structured response to the question. The acronym stands for…

A – Answer all parts of the question in complete sentences.

C – Cite evidence from the text.

E – Explain how your evidence proves or supports your answer.

Check out this free staggered flip organizer explaining the ACE Writing Strategy.A – Answer all parts of the question in complete sentences.

  • Carefully read the question.
  • Reword the original question in the form of an introductory sentence.
  • Be sure to include the key words.

This will prove that you understand the question.

C – Cite evidence from the text.

Find evidence from the reading selection, graphics, or illustrations to support or prove your answer.

Use a transitional phrase to introduce your quote:

According to the text…

For example…

For instance…

To illustrate…

Remember, quotation marks must enclose cited text.

E – Explain how your evidence proves or supports your answer.

  • Make a clear connection between the evidence you cite and the question asked.
  • Explain how the quotation supports your answer.
  • Conclude by adding your thoughts.

Example

Question – From which point of view is The Wonderful Wizard of Oz told? What is the narrator’s perspective?

A (Notice the key words point of view and perspective as well as The Wonderful Wizard of Oz are used in the introductory sentence.)

The reader can find the point of view and perspective used in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by reading a small selection of the story. 

C (Three passages are quoted.)

In the text, the author reveals Dorothy’s thoughts. “Dorothy was puzzled at this, for it sounded queer to hear a stuffed man speak, and to see him bow and walk along beside her.” The narrator also tells the reader that Dorothy was “truly sorry for him.” Toto’s thoughts are also included, “Toto did not like this addition to the party at first.”

E (An explanation connects the quotes to the answer.)

L. Frank Baum tells The Wonderful Wizard of Oz from third person point of view through a narrator. The reader knows this because the narrator uses characters’ names in place of the pronoun I when revealing thoughts. The narrator also shows the thoughts of more than one character creating an omniscient viewpoint.


This download contains printables to create the staggered flip organizer to teach these steps to students. 

Gay Miller

Permanent link to this article: http://bookunitsteacher.com/wp/?p=6152

I Survived the Children’s Blizzard, 1888 Teaching Ideas

I Survived the Children’s Blizzard, 1888 

The Story

Lauren Tarshis’s sixteenth book in her popular I Survived Series tackles the Children’s Blizzard. Readers are on the edge of their seats waiting to see how John will survive.

John Hale was an eleven-year-old boy whose family had moved from Chicago to Dakota in 1886. They wanted to get the 160 acres of free land promised to settlers in the Homestead Act of 1862.

On January 12, the day started out warm at around thirty degrees. John and his sister Franny enjoyed a fun recess at school. All of a sudden, a blizzard blew in and the children had to make a mad dash for the schoolhouse. John thought Franny was still outside playing hide-and-seek. In one terrifying scene, John braved the storm to find Franny.

Later when the coal was about to run out, John’s father and two other men came to rescue the children from the one-room schoolhouse. While the children were being loaded into horse drawn sleds, the roof of the schoolhouse collapsed spooking the horse pulling John’s sled. John and his three friends were pulled by the horse into the storm.

Read to find out how John survives the runaway horse. 

Teachable Moments

  • Homestead Act of 1862
  • grasshopper invasions
  • living on the prairie
  • problems settlers had traveling west
  • ways to survive in the cold 

FREE Teaching Ideas to use with
I Survived the Children’s Blizzard, 1888

Activity #1

This three minute video, narrated by Senator Ben Sasse, gives an overview of the Schoolchildren’s Blizzard. 

Learn about the Children’s Blizzard.

Activity #2 

Read Chapter 1 online.    

Activity #3

Lauren Tarshis’s website contains additional teaching resources. For I Survived the Children’s Blizzard, 1888, the author offers a comprehension check. This check asks one knowledge level question for each chapter. Novel activities includes a printable with figurative language examples from the the book for students to identify. You can also print a four page quiz.

Activity #4

An exceptional video about locusts narrated by Tarshis provides a lot of nonfictional information. In the video, Tarshis mentions “primary sources” and provides several examples of how she changed passages to “show, don’t tell.”

Activity #5

See what Lauren Tarshis is planning next. I Survived the Attack of the Grizzlies, 1967 comes out September 25, 2018.

The story tell of bear attacks in Glacier National Park.

Purchase the I Survived Growing Bundle at a huge discount.

Purchase the I Survived Growing Bundle and save $$$. Activity #6

If you would like to try out the I Survived the Children’s Blizzard Book Unit before you buy it, this download contains free samples for Chapters 1-2.

Grab these free samples from I Survived the Children's Blizzard, 1888 Novel Study.

This book unit contains graphic organizers for an interactive notebook. Vocabulary, comprehension, writing, and skill practice are all included. In addition to the printables, many paperless options are provided. Activities for Google Slides include writing and skill practice. Boom Learning Decks make this an interactive unit.

Gay Miller

 

Permanent link to this article: http://bookunitsteacher.com/wp/?p=6170

RUNNERS – A Test Taking Strategy

What is the RUNNERS Strategy?

 

Help students succeed when answering multiple choice questions with the RUNNERS Strategy. This acronym teaching device helps students break down reading passages, so they can more easily answer multiple choice questions. By implementing this strategy, students will have a better understanding of what they read causing them to more accurately answer questions.

R – Read the title and predict.

U – Underline key words in the question.

N – Number the paragraphs.

N – Now read the passage.

E – Enclose key words.

R – Read the questions eliminating wrong options.

S – Select the best answer.

Download this free printable Runners Strategy Staggered Flip Organizer.R – Read the title and predict.

  • Read the title of the passage and look at any graphics, pictures, and subheadings.
  • Does the font change size? Is some font italicized?
  • Are the pictures, photographs, or drawings of real people, events, or objects?

Make predictions:

  • What is the genre?
  • What is the author’s purpose?
  • Does the passage appear to be fiction or nonfiction?

U – Underline key words in the question.

Underline key words, names, and dates in the question.

Is the question asking you to …

  • make an inference
  • find the main idea
  • determine the author’s purpose
  • sequence events
  • locate a detail
  • determine a theme or central message
  • make a comparison
  • etc.

N – Number the paragraphs.

Number the paragraphs unless the passage contains a lot of dialogue between characters.

Take notice of text features.

N – Now read the passage.

Read the selection taking notes.

Possible things to write in the margins:

  • a summary
  • predictions
  • opinions
  • connections
  • questions
  • analyze the author’s craft
    • setting
    • characterization
    • plot
    • conflict
    • point of view
    • figurative language
    • etc.
  • write reflections
  • look for patterns

E – Enclose key words.

Not only can you enclose key words, but you can also mark up the passage using these codes:

  • highlight – important details
  • question mark (?) – things I don’t understand
  • underline – vocabulary
  • circle – who or what
  • box – where and when

R – Reread the questions.

Underline key words, names, dates in the question.

Reread the questions focusing on the important words.

Eliminate incorrect responses. (Slash the trash.)

S – Select the best answer.

Make sure you can show proof in the passage of where your answer was found.

This download contains printables to create the staggered flip organizer to teach these steps to students. 

Gay Miller

Permanent link to this article: http://bookunitsteacher.com/wp/?p=6147

Prisoner B-3087 Teaching Ideas

Prisoner B-3087 

The Story

Ten-year-old Yanek entertains his family with an after dinner light show when the Germans invade his hometown of Kraków, Poland. Days later a wall is built forming the Jewish ghetto. After this, a series of rules change Yanek’s life. No school for Jews. – His father’s business is taken. – Food is rationed. – A curfew is set. – Jews are deported both to concentration camps and into the Jewish ghetto. Yanek’s family must share their apartment with three other families. Yanek must work in a tailor’s shop.

When Yanek turns 13, he and his father sneak out to an abandoned building to give Yanek a secret bar mitzvah ceremony. Soon afterwards, Yanek sees his parents being deported. Yanek decides to keep working at the tailor shop in hopes of not being deported. This, however, it the very reason he is taken. Tailors are needed at the concentration camp. Yanek lives through ten concentration camps and two death marches over the next three years.

FREE Teaching Ideas to use with
Prisoner B-3087

Activity #1 Book Trailer

Watch the book trailer. This makes a great hook activity for the novel. 

Activity #2 Animated Maps

The Holocaust Encyclopedia provides a whole series of videos in a section titles Animated Maps. This  six minute video titled World War II and the Holocaust gives a great overview of the Holocaust.    

Activity #3 Real Characters

Prisoner B-3087 is a fictional book based on the life of Jack Gruener. Because the book is based on a real person, some of the other characters in the story were based on real people as well. Have students do a little reach to find out about these characters/real people.

  • Amon Goeth – Commandant of Kraków-Płaszów Concentration Camp
  • Josef Mengele – cruel staff doctor at Auschwitz
  • Ilse Koch (the Witch of Buchenwald) – Buchenwald Camp commandant’s wife

Activity #4 Teacher Resources on the Holocaust

 Activity #5 Holocaust Literature

Read more books that center around the Holocaust.

Fiction

  • Erika’s Story by Ruth Vander Zee
  • Number the Stars by Lois Lowry
  • Odin’s Promise by Sandy Brehl
  • Yellow Star by Jennifer Roy
  • The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak
  • The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne
  • The Devil’s Arithmetic by Jane Yolen
  • In My Hands” Memories of a Holocaust Rescuer by Irene Gut Opdyke and Jennifer Armstrong
  • The Girl in the Green Sweater by Krystyna Chiger and Daniel Paisner
  • The Girl in the Blue Coat by Monica Hesse (Grade 9 up)

    Great Books to Compare and Contrast

  • Edith’s Story: The True Story of How One Young Girl Survived World War II by Edith Velmans and Hester Velmans
  • The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank

    Nonfiction

  • Women Heroes of World War II: 36 Stories of Espionage, Sabotage, Resistance, and Rescue
    by Kathryn J. Atwood

 

Activity #6 Free Samples from Prisoner B-3087 Book Unit

If you would like to try out the Prisoner B-3087 Book Unit before you buy it, this download contains free samples for Chapters 1-2.

Free Samples of Prisoner B-3087 Book Unit

Prisoner B-3087 contains graphic organizers for an interactive notebook. Vocabulary, comprehension, writing, and skill practice are all included. In addition to the printables, many paperless options are provided. Activities for Google Slides include writing and skill practice. Boom Learning Decks make this an interactive unit.

Gay Miller

 

Permanent link to this article: http://bookunitsteacher.com/wp/?p=6125

Academic and Testing Vocabulary

What is an academic vocabulary?

 

Academic vocabulary consists of words that are not commonly used or frequently encountered in everyday conversation. These words include specialized content vocabulary for specific subjects such as reading/language art, science, social studies, or math. Academic vocabulary also includes terms found on standardized tests.  When students understand testing vocabulary, test scores go up. By teaching test vocabulary and how the words look in different forms on a test, students feel better prepared and more confident on test day.

When to Teach Words

When preparing units of study such as novel studies, add four to five academic vocabulary words in with the novel specific words. Select words based on the skills taught during the unit of study. 

Vocabulary Teaching Method

Select two or three vocabulary words a day. With a restrictive number of words, students can practice every word, every day during the unit. Students will hear the words over and over again which is essential for long-term memory. Also for regular vocabulary words, select a large number of synonyms for each vocabulary word to use in this daily study.

Regular Vocabulary Routine

Every day, students create vocabulary cards with these words, definitions, and/or word webs. 

On one side of the index card, have students write the vocabulary word in large letters so that it may be used as a response card. On the reverse side, students write word webs. For daily practice, students spread their index cards with the words facing up on their desktops. The teacher calls out definitions, synonyms, antonyms, or sentences with missing words, etc. Students locate the correct word and hold up the card. This is a great way for the teacher to check to determine if students need additional practice or if most know the words. Also, each student is participating with each teacher request – the every student, every time theory. Simply add academic vocabulary words in the mix. In place of word webs, students should write definitions and examples.

Free Editable Academic Vocabulary Matching ActivityThis download contains materials to aid in teaching academic vocabulary. You will find the following:

  • a set of 25 cards with essay question vocabulary
  • a second set of 25 cards with the meanings of the essay question vocabulary
  • a storage pocket for the essay question vocabulary and a separate pocket for the meanings
  • an answer key showing how to match the essay question vocabulary with the correct meanings

PLUS

  • a blank card for you to create additional cards
  • a link to the editable versions of the cards in Google Slides
  • a page of links to great academic vocabulary lists
  • additional storage pockets for language arts, math, science, and social studies

Ways to Use the Materials

  • The cards may be printed on cardstock, laminated for repeated use, cut apart, and placed in a learning center or used for morning work. Students simply match each vocabulary word with its meaning.
  • If you have students who need a lot of practice, storage pockets for interactive notebooks are provided. Print a set of cards for each student. Have students cut the cards apart. After students practice matching the vocabulary words to the meanings, the cards can be stored in the pockets for easy access for additional use.

Gay Miller

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